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School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences

Back to Catalog Home Page

Dean: D. Bruce Conn
Science Center, Room 301 Telephone: (706) 236-1756 FAX: (706) 238-7855
E-mail: mans@berry.edu

The School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences offers eight majors, seven minors and two dual-degree programs. All graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree.
 

Majors
Animal Science
Biology
Chemistry
Biochemistry
Computer Science
Environmental Sciences
    Biology concentration
    Chemistry concentration
    Geoscience concentration     
    Public Policy concentration
Mathematics
    Mathematics Education
Physics
Minors
Animal Science
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Science
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
 
Dual-Degree Programs
Engineering
Nursing

The School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences is composed of the departments of animal science, biology, chemistry, mathematics and computer science, and physics, astronomy and geology. Throughout the school, an emphasis on inquiry, research and problem solving guides the curriculum and classroom practice. The school strives to provide for all Berry students opportunities to gain an appreciation for scientific thought and methods, and logical and mathematical reasoning. For students who seek greater experience in these areas, there are opportunities for mastery of the content in one or more disciplines, for experiential learning in laboratories and field study, and for the development of a desirable work ethic.

 

Animal Science

Professor Gallagher; Associate Professor Wilson; Assistant Professors Daniel, Fincham, and Kitts;
Senior Lecturer Goldberg
Westcott Building, Room 203 Telephone: (706) 236-1737 FAX: (706) 236-2223

The department of animal science provides students with a firm foundation in the biological and natural sciences as they relate to animal science in preparation for meaningful, rewarding and challenging animal-related professions. The program is based on high academic standards. This department emphasizes student-centered learning as demonstrated by the laboratories that are associated with the classes. There also is the opportunity to work in one of the three animal teaching/research units on campus as well as to participate in undergraduate research. The department supports and actively engages in community service projects.

 


Animal Science Major

The animal-science curriculum is designed for students interested in professional careers in animal-related industries. Completion of the animal-science program prepares students to pursue careers encompassing all aspects of the vast field of livestock production and management as well as related service industries.

The curriculum is designed with sufficient flexibility to provide ample preparation for postgraduate studies and research. Students are encouraged to complete specific courses within their areas of interest to enhance their knowledge and future success in a graduate program. Undergraduate students also have the opportunity to conduct and present research with faculty members in the department.

A curriculum is available for students planning to apply for admission into a college of veterinary medicine. The program requirements are similar to those of the animal-science major. However, additional science courses must be completed in accordance with admission policies of colleges of veterinary medicine.

Requirements 40 - 44 hours
 

ANS 120 Introduction to Animal Science
3-2-4
ANS 200 Livestock Feeding and Ration Formulation
3-2-4
ANS 322WI Principles of Nutrition
3-0-3
ANS 324 Genetics of Livestock Improvement
3-2-4
ANS 326 Anatomy and Physiology
3-2-4
ANS 327 Reproductive Physiology
3-2-4
ANS 421WI Animal Health and Diseases
3-2-4
ANS 491 Seminar
1-0-1
  and select four from   
ANS 323 Forage Production
3-2-4
ANS 330 Comparative Exercise Physiology
3-0-3
ANS 331 Equine Evaluation
3-2-4
ANS 332 Companion Animal Science
3-2-4
ANS 422WI Beef Systems and Management
3-2-4
ANS 423 Dairy Systems and Management
3-2-4
ANS 424 Horse Systems and Management
3-2-4
ANS 425 Swine and Poultry Systems and Management
3-0-3
ANS 426 Sheep Systems and Management
3-2-4
ANS 429WI Behavior of Domestic Animals
3-2-4
ANS 433 Neural, Muscular and Renal Physiology
3-0-3
ANS 434 Cardiovascular, Pulmonary and Hepatic Physiology
3-0-3
Additional Requirements:     
BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology
3-2-4
BIO 202 Principles of Zoology
3-2-4
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
MAT 120 Precalculus or 
4-0-4
MAT 201 Calculus or  
4-0-4
  higher-level math  


Animal science majors who choose to minor in chemistry will be exempt from the major requirements of completing CHM 108, 109 and 221.


Animal Science Minor
Requirements: 18 hours in courses with ANS prefix. Nine hours in courses numbered 300 or above must be taken in residence at Berry.

 

Biology

Professors Cipollini, and Conn; Reid Professor Graham; Associate Professors Davin, Hall, Morgan and Mowry;
Assistant Professors Borer and Carleton; Lecturer Orloff
Science Center, Room 366B Telephone: (706) 236-1712 FAX: (706) 238-7855

Courses leading to a degree in biology are taken by students pursuing careers in research, teaching and an array of professional vocations. Ecology, medical technology, genetics, paleontology, biotechnology, marine biology, optometry, medicine, veterinary medicine and dentistry are but a few specific fields chosen by the successful biology major. Almost all graduate schools and professional institutions require specific national entrance tests, and the majority of students pursuing advanced degrees or professional training will take either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT) or the Dental Admission Test (DAT). Because these tests include a significant biological component, the department has designed its introductory curriculum in part to reflect this coverage.

Individual programs, concentrating study in a particular area and including an internship or extended study at another institution or laboratory, such as marine biology, are available with appropriate administrative consent.

Research opportunities in biology are available through the student work program and BIO 498 (Directed Study), and cooperative projects can be arranged with other departments. Highly motivated seniors with an overall grade-point average of 3.3 or better may choose to enroll in BIO 499, Senior Thesis, and conduct an original research project with a mentor of their choice. The department sponsors activities through the Biology Club, Sigma Xi and the Tau Alpha Chapter of Tri-Beta, a national biology honor society.

 

Biology Major Requirements


The program in biology requires a core of 21 semester hours of course work, as follows:
 

BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology
3-2-4
BIO 202 Principles of Zoology
3-2-4
BIO 204 Genetics
3-3-4
BIO 215 Principles of Microbiology and Botany
3-2-4
BIO 305 General Ecology
3-3-4
BIO 490 Seminar in Biology
1-0-1


All students majoring in biology must take five additional elective biology courses at the 200 level or above (at least 19 semester hours). Fifteen hours numbered 300 and above must be taken in residence. Within this block of courses students may select those subdisciplines that best suit their needs.

A number of courses in marine biology are offered through the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL), Ocean Springs, Mississippi, (www.usm.edu/gcrl) during the summer term. Students may register for the courses as a transient and up to two courses taken at GCRL will count as electives toward a major in biology.

The Berry College biology department is also affiliated with the Highlands Biological Station (www.wcu.edu/hbs/). One of these courses can count as a biology elective, with departmental approval.

 

Additional Science and Mathematics Requirements

Concentration I is for students planning to attend graduate or professional school in biology or the health sciences. In addition to the biology core and biology elective courses, students pursuing Concentration I must also complete:
 

Chemistry 16 hours at the CHM 108 level or above. Chemistry
minors are exempt from this requirement.
Mathematics 7 hours minimum (MAT 111 Statistics required, MAT 201 strongly encouraged.)
Physics 4 hours (PHY 111 or PHY 211 required; PHY 112 or 212 strongly encouraged.)


Concentration II is for students who have interests other than graduate or professional school in biology or the health sciences (i.e. secondary education, science journalism, double majors, business minors). In addition to the biology core and biology elective courses, students pursuing Concentration II must also complete:

Chemistry: 4 hours at the CHM 108 level or higher. Chemistry minors are exempt from this requirement.
Math and Science Electives: Five courses taken from ANS, AST, BIO, CHM, EVS, GEO, MAT or PHY. Only one of these electives may be chosen from the following: ANS 105, BIO 103, BIO 105, BIO 106, BIO 108 or PHY 101. Students may not use CHM 102 for this elective credit. BIO 103 may not be used as the math and science elective credit if the major has first completed BIO 111. In addition, at least two of these courses must be non-BIO courses. Students having a minor in secondary education may substitute EDU 499 for one of the science electives.

Biology Minor
A minor in biology requires 19-20 hours, as follows:
 

BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology
3-2-4
BIO 202 Principles of Zoology
3-2-4
BIO 215 Principles of Microbiology and Botany
3-2-4
  One of the following courses:  
BIO 204 Genetics
3-3-4
BIO 305 General Ecology
3-3-4
  Plus one additional biology course at the 200 level or above.  

Requirements for Teacher Certification in Secondary-School Science

Students planning to become certified to teach biology in Georgia public secondary schools must complete a major in biology and a minor in education. One course in microbiology, one course in plant biology, and one course in ethics should be successfully completed to meet the National Science Standards for certification in teaching biology. Such courses include BIO 301, Microbiology; BIO 311WI, General Botany; or BIO 313WI, Forest Ecology; and PHI 358, Bioethics or PHI 359WI, Environmental Ethics. Other recommended courses include BIO 206, 303, 332WI, 341, 415, 482 and 483, and EVS 104. The student must be assigned an advisor in education in addition to her or his biology advisor.

 

Requirements for Dual-Degree Nursing Program
Berry College and Nell Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University

Communication:   
COM 203 Introduction to Speech
3-0-3
ENG 101 First-Year Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing
3-0-3
ENG 102 First-Year Seminar in Critical Inquiry and
Writing
3-0-3
Health and Physical Education:   
HPE Activity
0-2-1
HPE Activity
0-2-1
HPE 220 First Aid or 
2-0-1
HPE 221 Survey of Fitness or  
0-2-1
HPE 222 College Health Topics
2-0-1
Behavioral Science:     
 
The courses listed below are required by the Nell Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory and will satisfy the behavioral-science component of Berry’s general education requirement.
 
ECO 110 Principles of Economics I
3-0-3
PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
3-0-3
SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology
3-0-3
Humanities:     
  Choose five courses, one from each of the four areas, plus HUM 200 or a fifth course from any of the four areas to be counted as a Humanities elective.  
Literature (Choose any 200-level course)
3-0-3
History (Choose one: HIS 154, 155, 205 or 206)
3-0-3
Fine Arts (Choose one: ART 201, ART 202, MUS 215)
3-0-3
  Woodruff specifies music or art appreciation.  
Religion/Philosophy (Choose any 100-level Course)
3-0-3
Other Berry Requirements:     
BCC 099 Library Skills or   
BCC 100 Freshman Seminar
1-0-1
Cultural Events:     
  Average of three for each semester of full-time enrollment at Berry.  
Mathematics:     
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
  Elementary Statistics is required by the Nell Woodruff School and will satisfy Berry’s general education mathematics requirement.  
Natural Sciences:     
BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology
3-2-4
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
  These science courses will satisfy Berry’s general education requirement and are required by the Nell Woodruff School.  
Electives Outside Major/Minor: 
Two three-hour courses.
 
BIO 206 Human Anatomy and Physiology I*
3-2-4
PSY 221WI Life-Span Developmental Psychology*
3-0-3
  *These courses are required by the Nell Woodruff School and will satisfy the electives outside the major or minor for Berry’s general educational requirements.  
Additional Requirements for the Nell Woodruff School:     
BIO 207
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3-2-4
BIO 301 Microbiology
2-4-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4


Information from Nell Woodruff Checklist:

Electives: Additional courses approved by the nursing faculty must combine with the above prerequisites (course specified by Emory) to equal at least 60 semester hours. Students are encouraged to take electives in the social sciences and humanities. Credit for biochemistry, pharmacology, physical education, applied art or music is not applicable in meeting general education requirements.

 

Berry Requirement:

Complete 93 hours at Berry or three-fourths of the program. This may include hours transferred to Berry College from other institutions, but a minimum of 62 hours must be completed in residence at Berry.

 

Other Berry Requirement:

Computer Literacy: successful completion of courses so designated within the major or a course such as
 

BUS 107 Business-Information Management
3-0-3


Berry Writing Requirement:

Students must complete two “writing-intensive” courses totaling a minimum of six semester hours. One of these may be at the 200 level; the other must be at the 300- or 400 level.
 

 


 

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Professor Breton; Dana Professor Earnest; Associate Professors Bressette and Martin; Assistant
Professors Harper and Hoke
Science Center, Room 305 Telephone: (706) 238-5856 FAX: (706) 238-7855

Chemistry is a molecular science. Modern chemistry is a broadly diverse science that is positioned at the interface of physics, biology and mathematics. The curriculum, which is one of only 13 chemistry programs in Georgia accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS), combines a solid background in fundamental principles of chemistry with firsthand experiences using state-of-the-art laboratory equipment. Because of chemistry’s centrality in the sciences, the chemistry and biochemistry majors are an excellent choice for those interested in a diverse range of careers, including medicine, dentistry, engineering, pharmacy, teaching or as a research scientist for government and industry. Students are highly encouraged to engage in research opportunities in a variety of chemical fields within the department through CHM 498. Students involved in research regularly travel to regional and national conferences with faculty members to present their research results, and many have had their research published in scholarly journals. Summer research opportunities both on and off campus are also available. The department sponsors activities on and off campus through the student-affiliate club, which has received honors and commendations from the American Chemical Society in recent years.

 

Objectives for Major

The Chemistry and Biochemistry Bachelor of Science degrees prepare students for a wide variety of science-related careers.    A sampling of these careers are provided on the Chemistry Department webpage under “Careers”.  Majors have the option of obtaining a B.S degree certified by the American Chemical Society (ACS).   While the ACS certified degree is intended primarily for those majors intending to pursue graduate or professional studies, all majors would benefit from the more rigorous curriculum
 

General-education Courses

Any course in chemistry with a laboratory component for which the student is prepared may be taken toward fulfillment of the general-education requirement in science. Chemistry 102, which is the chemistry general-education course taken by most non-science majors, may not be used to fulfill the requirements for a major or minor in any science area. Chemistry 250 may not be used to fulfill the requirements for a major or minor in any science area other than the environmental sciences.
 

American Chemical Society Certified Majors

For both Chemistry and Biochemistry majors there are two options students may complete; a non-ACS and an ACS approved major.  The non-ACS major is intended primarily for those students who do not intend to pursue graduate or professional studies.  The ACS major contains greater depth and is ideally suited for those wishing to pursue graduate or professional studies upon graduation. Students who will complete the ACS certified major must notify the chemistry department chair.  Because the ACS approved majors require a specific number of course and laboratory hours, students should consult with their advisor to ensure they will meet these requirements. The department will track progress toward the ACS degrees and will award a certificate from the American Chemical Society.

Requirements for Chemistry Major (non-ACS Approved Degree)
A student pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in chemistry must complete a minimum of 37 hours of chemistry, including the following:

Foundational Chemistry Courses (28 hours):   
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 315WI Analytical Chemistry
3-3-4
CHM 331WI Physical Chemistry: Foundations
3-3-4
CHM 341 Biochemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 405WI Inorganic Chemistry
3-3-4
In-Depth Chemistry Courses (9 hours):   
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 490 Seminar
1-0-1
and 4 additional hours at the 300 level or higher
4 hours
Additional Science and Mathematics Requirements (15 - 16 hours):   
PHY One-year college-level sequence
8 hours
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus or 
4-0-4
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3



Requirements for Chemistry Major (ACS Approved Degree)
A student pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in chemistry must complete a minimum of 43 hours of chemistry, including the following:

Foundational Chemistry Courses (28 hours):   
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 315WI Analytical Chemistry
3-3-4
CHM 331WI Physical Chemistry: Foundations
3-3-4
CHM 341 Biochemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 405WI Inorganic Chemistry
3-3-4
In-Depth Chemistry Courses (15 - 21 hours):   
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 332 Physical Chemistry:  Applications
3-3-4
CHM 490 Seminar
1-0-1
Students must also take at least two additional courses from the 300 or 400 level so the number of in-depth course credit hours totals at least 12, and the number of in-depth laboratory hours totals at least 190.  With prior granted permission and stipulations, research hours completed off campus, or as part of the student work program, may also count towards these requirements.  Possible combinations for additional in-depth courses include: 
  Three additional courses with lab
12 hours
  Two additional courses with lab and 1 hour of CHM 498
9 hours
  One additional course with lab and 2 hours of CHM 498
6 hours
Additional Science and Mathematics Requirements (16 hours):   
PHY One-year college-level sequence
8 hours
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus
4-0-4

 

Requirements for Biochemistry Major (non-ACS Approved Degree)
A student pursuing a concentration in biochemistry must complete a minimum of 32 hours of chemistry, including the following:
 

Foundational Chemistry Courses (20 hours):   
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 341 Biochemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 315WI Analytical Chemistry or 
3-3-4
CHM 331WI Physical Chemistry: Foundations
3-3-4
In-Depth Chemistry Courses (12 - 13 hours):   
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 342 Biochemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 490 Seminar
1-0-1
and one additional chemistry WI course at the 300 level or higher
3 - 4 hours
Additional Science and Mathematics Requirements (23 - 24 hours):   
PHY

One-year college-level sequence

8 hours
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus or 
4-0-4
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
BIO 111 and one additional BIO course at the 200 level or higher.
8 hours

The course requirements in biology for a Biochemistry major are waived for those students obtaining a biology minor.

Requirements for Biochemistry Major (ACS Approved Degree)
A student pursuing a concentration in biochemistry must complete a minimum of 36 hours of chemistry, including the following:

Foundational Chemistry Courses (28 hours):   
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 315WI Analytical Chemistry
3-3-4
CHM 331WI Physical Chemistry: Foundations
3-3-4
CHM 341 Biochemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 405WI Inorganic Chemistry
3-3-4
In-Depth Chemistry Courses (15 - 21 hours):   
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 342 Biochemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 490 Seminar
1-0-1
Students must also take at least two additional courses from the 300 or 400 level so the number of in-depth course credit hours totals at least 12, and the number of in-depth laboratory hours totals at least 190.  With prior granted permission and stipulations, research hours completed off campus, or as part of the student work program, may also count towards these requirements.  Possible combinations for additional in-depth courses include: 
  Three additional courses with lab
12 hours
  Two additional courses with lab and 1 hour of CHM 498
9 hours
  One additional course with lab and 2 hours of CHM 498
6 hours
Additional Science and Mathematics Requirements (24 hours):   
PHY One-year college-level sequence
8 hours
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus
4-0-4
BIO 111 and one additional BIO course at the 200 level or higher.
8 hours

The course requirements in biology for a Biochemistry major are waived for those students obtaining a biology minor.

Requirements for the Minor in Chemistry

A minor in chemistry requires a minimum of 20 hours, including these:

CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 109
General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
plus 4 additional hours of Chemistry courses at the 300 level or above.
Requirements for Teacher Certification in Secondary-School Science

Students planning to become certified to teach chemistry in Georgia public secondary schools must complete a concentration in chemistry and a minor in education. The student must be assigned an advisor in education in addition to her or his chemistry advisor. In order to become certified to teach chemistry in Georgia, students must pass the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE). Regardless of the chemistry concentration chosen, enrolling in BIO 111 and two upper-level biology courses is strongly encouraged.

 

Environmental Sciences

Faculty:Coordinator and Associate Professor Davin. Also, faculty of the departments
offering concentrations.
Science Center, Room 366A Telephone: (706) 290-2663

The environmental-sciences major at Berry College is an interdisciplinary program for the study of the earth’s environment and human interactions with that environment. All students in the program take courses that address environmental issues from natural science, sociocultural and economic perspectives. Each student also chooses an area of concentration that focuses on either biology, chemistry, geoscience or public policy. The remaining required courses in the upper-level curriculum are selected in consultation with the student’s advisor to address a specific area of interest or career objective. A flexible combination of courses allows students majoring in environmental sciences a broad-spectrum curriculum that would be difficult to obtain in more traditional science or social-science programs.

Like all liberal-arts degrees, the Bachelor of Science, with a major in environmental sciences, is not a vocational or professional degree. It is not designed to provide training for a specific career. By providing an in-depth understanding of environmental issues, however, the curriculum in environmental sciences prepares a student for graduate studies in environmental or related sciences, for regulatory governmental positions or for other jobs in the industrial, corporate, service or education sectors that require interdisciplinary training. The environmental-sciences program also gives students opportunities for internships, directed or independent studies, cooperative research with faculty, and summer studies at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, or the Highlands Biological Station in Highlands, North Carolina.

Environmental Sciences Major Requirements
Each student must complete all the core requirements listed below, plus the designated courses for one area of concentration.
 

Core Requirements    
41 hours
EVS 104 Introduction to Environmental Sciences
3-2-4
EVS 405 Environmental Sciences Methods
2-4-4
EVS 490 Environmental Sciences Seminar
1-0-1
BI0 202 Principles of Zoology or 
3-2-4
BIO 215 Principles of Microbiology and Botany
3-2-4
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
ECO 110 Principles of Economics I
3-0-3
GEO 101 Physical Geology
3-2-4
GOV 211 American National Government
3-0-3
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
PHI 359WI Environmental Ethics
3-0-3


Plus 8 hours of electives, chosen from a list of approved courses, offered by a school other than that of the student’s area of concentration. A student whose area of concentration is in the natural sciences must choose non-science electives. A student whose area of concentration is outside the natural sciences must choose science electives.

 

Approved Non-science Electives   
ANT 200 Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
BUS 210 Legal Environment of Business
3-0-3
COM 301 Writing for the Mass Media
2-2-3
ECO 470 Environmental Economics*
3-0-3
GOV 207 Contemporary World Issues
3-0-3
SOC 355 Environmental Sociology*
3-0-3
Approved Science Electives   
BIO 305 General Ecology
3-3-4
BIO 482 Coral Reef Ecology
2-4-4
BIO 483 Tropical Biodiversity
2-4-4
CHM 109 General Chemistry II*
3-3-4
CHM 250 Environmental Chemistry
3-3-4
GEO 320 Environmental Geology*
3-3-4
GEO 360 Geomorphology
3-3-4
*Please check catalog listing for prerequisites.  


Areas of Concentration

Each area of concentration is offered and administered by an individual department or a group of departments working jointly. Each area of concentration requires at least 18 hours, but not more than 27 hours.

 

Area of Concentration in biology 27 hours  
Requirements 12 hours  
BIO 111 Principles of Cell Biology
3-2-4
BIO 305 General Ecology
3-3-4
BIO 405 Conservation Biology
3-3-4
Electives 15 hours    
Minimum of 15 hours of BIO at the 200 level or above*
*The electives may include up to two courses from the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (see Biology) or at the Highlands Biological Station.


Area of concentration in chemistry 20 hours  
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 315 WI Analytical Chemistry
3-3-4
CHM 341 Biochemistry I
3-3-4
AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN GEOSCIENCE at least 23 hours
GEO 320 Environmental Geology
3-3-4
GEO 360 Geomorphology
3-3-4
GEO 420 Hydrology
3-2-4
CHM 250 Environmental Chemistry
3-3-4
Electives Minimum of 7 hours from the following (only one course may be taken at the 100 level)  
BIO 305 General Ecology
3-3-4
BIO 315 Marine Science I: Oceanography*
3-4-5
CHM 109 General Chemistry II
3-3-4
CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I
3-3-4
CHM 315 WI Analytical Chemistry
3-3-4
GEO 102 Historical Geology
3-2-4
GEO 482 Coastal Marine Geology*
2-2-3
PHY 111 Mechanics, Heat and Sound
3-2-4
*Offered through the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory  
AREA OF CONCENTRATION IN PUBLIC POLICY 24 hours
SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology or   
ANT 200 Cultural Anthropology
3-0-3
ECO 210 Principles of Economics II
3-0-3
ECO 430 Public Economics
3-0-3
ECO 470 Environmental Economics
3-0-3
GOV 420WI Public Administration and Public Policy
3-0-3
SOC 355 Environmental Sociology
3-0-3
One of the following:  
ECO 420 Introduction to Econometrics
3-0-3
GOV 393WI Social Science Research Methods
3-0-3
SOC 305WI Social Science Research Methods
3-0-3
One of the following:  
GOV 331 International Political Economy
3-0-3
GOV 411 International Law and Organizations
3-0-3

Mathematics and Computer Science

Professor Clendenning; Associate Professors McDowell,
Prince, Tapia and R. Taylor; Assistant Professors Benzel, Hamid and Kapitza; Lecturer Johnson
Science Center, Room 355 Telephone: (706) 238-5856 Fax: (706) 238-7849

The growth of technology in our society has increased the need for individuals with analytical skills and experience in developing and using technology. Majors in the mathematical and computer sciences prepare students for a wide variety of careers requiring problem solving, logical reasoning and applications of current technology. Students who have majored in the mathematical sciences have received excellent preparation for graduate studies in a variety of fields, including engineering, law and medicine. The department offers majors in mathematics and computer science. Within the mathematics major, students may choose a mathematics or a mathematics education concentration. Students who choose the mathematics education concentration also take an education minor and are certified to teach mathematics in grades 6-12 in Georgia. All programs lead to the Bachelor of Science degree.

 

Majors

Mathematics
A mathematics concentration must have a minimum of 44 semester hours in mathematics courses.

The minor in mathematics requires 19 hours in mathematics courses; nine of these hours must be numbered 300 or above.

Requirements for Mathematics Concentration      44 hours
The following courses are required for a concentration in mathematics:
 

CSC 120 Principles of Computer Science I
3-2-4
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 202 Calculus II
4-0-4
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus
4-0-4
MAT/CSC 219 Discrete Structures
3-0-3
MAT 303 Linear Algebra
3-0-3
MAT 304 Differential Equations
3-0-3
MAT 305WI Proof Structures and Techniques
3-0-3
MAT 403WI introduction to Abstract Algebra I
3-0-3
MAT 414 Real Analysis
3-0-3
MAT 490 Mathematics Seminar
1-0-1
and 9 hours of electives from among the following:  
MAT 311 Probability and Statistics
3-0-3
MAT 312WI Modern Geometry
3-0-3
MAT/CSC 319 Combinatorial Mathematics
3-0-3
MAT 417 Complex Analysis
3-0-3
MAT 420 Advanced Topics in Mathematics
3-0-3
MAT 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours


Requirements for Mathematics Education Concentration
40 hours

The following courses are required for a concentration in mathematics education with emphasis on teaching secondary mathematics. In addition, the requirements for a minor in secondary education must be satisfied.
 

CSC 120 Principles of Computer Science I
3-2-4
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
MAT 202 Calculus II
4-0-4
MAT/CSC 219 Discrete Structures
3-0-3
MAT 303 Linear Algebra
3-0-3
MAT 305WI Proof Structures and Techniques
3-0-3
MAT 312WI Modern Geometry
3-0-3
MAT 340 Technology-Enhanced Instruction in
Mathematics 5-12
3-0-3
MAT 400 Senior Seminar in Mathematics
Education
1-0-1
MAT 403WI Introduction to Abstract Algebra
3-0-3
In addition, a minimum of three hours must be selected from these courses:
MAT 203 Multivariable Calculus
4-0-4
MAT 304 Differential Equations
3-0-3
MAT 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours
In addition, a minimum of three hours must be selected from
these courses:
MAT 414 Real Analysis
3-0-3
MAT 417 Complex Analysis
3-0-3
MAT 420 Advanced Topics in Mathematics
3-0-3
MAT 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours

Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics

The minor in mathematics requires MAT 201, MAT 219, MAT 401 and 11 additional hours in mathematics courses; at least 8 of these additional hours must be numbered 300 or above.

 

Computer Science

Requirements for the Major

The major requires a minimum of 41 semester hours of course work in computer science: 29 hours of core courses, and another 12 hours of advanced study within the field. An additional minimum of 3 to 4 semester hours of course work in mathematics is required to complete the major.
Required Courses
 

Core  
29 hours
CSC 120 Principles of Computer Science I
3-2-4
CSC 121 Principles of Computer Science II
3-2-4
CSC 219 Discrete Structures
3-0-3
CSC 220 Data Structures and Algorithms
3-2-4
CSC 300 Professional and Social Contexts
1-0-1
CSC 320 Algorithms and Models of Computation
3-0-3
CSC 340WI Operating Systems
3-0-3
CSC 350 computer Organization and Architecture
3-2-4
CSC 490WI Senior Project
3-0-3
Computer science majors must earn a C or better in all CSC core courses.
Mathematics   
7 hours
MAT 111 Elementary Statistics
3-0-3
MAT 201 Calculus I
4-0-4
Electives     
Advanced Study 12 hours  
In addition to the core, another 12 hours of computer science course work must be completed, chosen from among the following:
CSC/MAT 319 Combinatorial Mathematics
3-0-3
CSC 333 Imbedded and Real-Time Microprocessor
Interfacing and Control
2-2-3
CSC 361 Systems Analysis and Design or    
CSC 362 Database Management Systems
3-0-3
CSC 404WI Organization of Programming Languages
3-0-3
CSC 420 Advanced Topics in Computer Science
3-0-3
CSC 450 Net-centric Computing or  
2-2-3
CSC 461 Data Communications and Networking
3-0-3
CSC 498 Directed Study
1 to 3 hours
Mathematics   
3-4 hours
One additional mathematics course chosen from among the following must also be completed. Students interested in pursuing graduate studies in computer science are strongly encouraged to take all three of these mathematics courses.
MAT 202 Calculus II
4-0-4
MAT 303 Linear Algebra  
MAT/CSC 319 Combinatorial Mathematics
3-0-3



Practical Work Experience
Students must engage in and document a practical work experience. Common ways to satisfy this requirement include: participation in the BITS program (1 semester), academic internship (3 semester hours), and cooperative (co-op) work experience (80 work hours). Students are encouraged to consult the Career Development Center for assistance in pursuing internship or co-op experience. Alternate methods may be proposed by the student and submitted to the department for approval.

Requirements for the Minor
The minor consists of 24 semester hours and must include:
 

CSC 120 Principles of Computer Science I
3-2-4
CSC 121 Principles of Computer Science II
3-2-4
CSC 219 Discrete Structures
3-0-3
CSC 220 Data Structures and Algorithms
3-2-4
CSC 320 Algorithms and Models of Computation
3-0-3
An additional 6 hours must be taken at the 300 level or above in residence at Berry.


Physics, Astronomy and Geology

Professor Whatley; Associate Professors Lane, Timberlake; Assistant Professor Jovanelly and Robb
Science Center, Room 338 Telephone:(706) 290-2673 Fax: (706) 238-7855

 

Physics

Physics, originally called natural philosophy, is the study of the physical world. Astronomy is the scientific study of the heavens and began as an independent discipline but came to be closely linked with physics in the 20th century. Physicists and astronomers use experiments and observations to study matter and energy, and to analyze the results and formulate theories using mathematics. Logical thinking and problem solving are emphasized.

Aims of the department of physics are to
 

  1. prepare physics majors for graduate schools or jobs in government laboratories or industry,
  2. guide dual-degree engineering students through their three years of education at Berry,
  3. provide courses in physics and astronomy as a service to other departments,
  4. help in preparing secondary-school teachers of science, and
  5. provide scientific training for individuals who enjoy physics and astronomy but want to work in other fields.
Requirements for the Major in Physics

Concentration I is for students aiming for careers in physics. It requires a minimum of 35 semester hours of physics and astronomy, with a minimum of 19 of those hours on the 300 and 400 levels. The following courses are required:
 

PHY 211 General Physics I with Calculus
3-2-4
PHY 212 General Physics II with Calculus
3-2-4
PHY 302 Classical Mechanics I
3-0-3
PHY 303 Electricity and Magnetism
3-0-3
PHY 307WI Modern Physics
3-0-3
PHY 310 Measuring the Fundamental Constants or 
1-2-2
PHY 311 Experimental Methods in Physics
1-2-2
PHY 410 Thermodynamics and Statistical
Mechanics
3-0-3
PHY 430WI Quantum Mechanics
3-0-3
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4
MAT 202 Calculus II
4-0-4
MAT 304 Differential Equations
3-0-3
Students who plan to attend graduate school should take additional courses in physics and mathematics, including MAT 303 Linear Algebra.


Concentration II is for all other students who desire a major in physics, such as those planning to teach physics at the secondary level or those with interests in engineering, meteorology or careers not specifically scientific or technical. Concentration II requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of physics and astronomy, of which at least 15 must be in the 300 and 400 levels from lecture courses not cross-listed. In the case that a student transfers to an engineering school (as in the dual-degree engineering program; see below), a number of the physics hours may be transferred back, subject to the approval of Berry’s physics department. Required courses are:
 

PHY 211 General Physics I with Calculus
3-2-4
PHY 212 General Physics II with Calculus
3-2-4
PHY 302 Classical Mechanics I
3-0-3
PHY 303 Electricity and Magnetism
3-0-3
PHY 307WI Modern Physics
3-0-3
PHY 310 Measuring the Fundamental Constants or   
PHY 311 Experimental Methods in Physics
1-2-2
MAT 202 Calculus II
4-0-4
MAT 304 Differential Equations
3-0-3
CHM 108 General Chemistry I
3-3-4

The Dual-Degree Engineering Program

Berry College maintains dual-degree programs with the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

In this program, the student is scheduled to attend Berry for approximately three years (six semesters). Then the student will transfer to Georgia Tech and take courses there for approximately two years (four, possibly five additional terms). At the end of that period, the student will have earned two baccalaureate degrees, one from Berry and one from Georgia Tech.

Under this program, students have the option of choosing a major or not choosing a major at Berry. Students choosing a major are encouraged to consider the Concentration II physics major that is specifically designed for dual-degree students and provides a strong background for a broad range of engineering specialties. Other majors are also possible. Certain ones may be particularly appropriate to a specific engineering specialty (e.g., chemical or computer engineering); however, these others majors may require an extra semester at Berry. If the student does not choose a major, the Berry degree will be in dual-degree engineering. The student is not limited in a choice of engineering specialty, although some specialties require certain courses at Berry and some may require an extra semester at Georgia Tech.

For more information, please contact the dual-degree coordinator:
Dr. Charles Lane
Dual-degree Coordinator
Campus Box 5004
Mount Berry, GA 30149-5004
706-290-2673
clane@berry.edu
Room 338C, Science Building

A gemera; description of the requirements for the program with the Georgia Institute of Technology is listed below. The specific requirements of each engineering field may be found at: http://www.berry.edu/academics/science/physics/astro/dualdegree.asp
 

Berry College Requirements

The student must complete 93 semester hours of courses at Berry. Among these courses, Berry requires the following:
 

Communication  
COM 203 Introduction to Speech  
ENG 101 First-Year Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing  
ENG 102 First-Year Seminar in Critical Inquiry and Writing  
Health and Physical Education 
HPE Activity    
HPE Activity    
HPE 220 or     
HPE 221 or     
HPE 222    
Behavioral and Social Sciences 
ECO 110: This course is required by Georgia Tech and will count
toward Berry’s general education requirement in the behavioral
and social sciences.
Select one course from two of the following three areas:
Government:  GOV 211 (GA Tech requires students to take GOV 211 or HIS 205 or HIS 206)
Psychology: PSY 101    
Sociology or Anthropology: SOC 200 or ANT 200
Humanities and Fine Arts 
HIS 205 or HIS 206. (GA Tech requires students to take GOV 211 or HIS 205 or HIS 206)
Select one course from each of the three following areas:
Fine Arts: ART 201, ART 202, MUS 215 or THE 201
Literature: Any 200-level literature course
Religion or Philosophy: Any 100-level course
HUM 200 or additional course noted here as history, fine arts, literature,
religion or philosophy.
Mathematics and Natural Sciences 
MAT 201. This course is required by Georgia Tech and will count
toward Berry’s general education requirement in mathematics.
CHM 108. This course is required by Georgia Tech and will count
toward Berry's general education requirement in the natural sciences.
PHY 211. This course is required by Georgia Tech and will count
toward Berry’s general education requirement in the natural sciences.
Electives     
Two courses for a total of no less than 6 semester hours, selected outside the student’s major discipline (if a major is chosen) and outside the student’s minor discipline (if a minor is chosen).
Berry College Courses 
BCC 099 or 100


Other Berry College Requirements
Writing-Intensive Courses: Students must complete two “writing-intensive” courses totaling a minimum of six semester hours at the 300 level or above. One of these courses must be PHY 307WI (see “Department Requirement” below); if the student has not chosen a major, then the other course may be from any discipline.

Cultural Events: The student must attend three approved cultural events for each semester of full-time enrollment at Berry.

Department Requirement
The Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geology requires that PHY 307WI be taken by all dual-degree engineering students, in partial fulfillment of Berry’s writing-intensive requirement.

 

Georgia Tech Requirements

For admission to Georgia Tech under the dual-degree program, the student must complete the 93 semester hours at Berry.  Students must have the following minimum GPA in all courses and in math/science courses:  2.7 for Georgia residents, 3.0 for US citizens and permanent residents not from Georgia, 3.5 for international students. You should take:
 

Mathematics:    
MAT 201 This course will satisfy Berry’s general education requirement for mathematics.
MAT 202, MAT 203, MAT 303, and MAT 304  
Computer Science:   
CSC 120  
CSC 121 (strongly recommended)
Natural Sciences:   
CHM 108 This course will satisfy Berry’s general education
requirement for the natural sciences.
CHM 109  
PHY 211 This course will satisfy Berry’s general education
requirement for the natural sciences.
PHY 212  
BIO 111 (only for those pursuing a degree in civil engineering)
General Courses:   
ENG 101, ENG 102  
GOV 211 or HIS 205 or HIS 206  
ECO 110  


Requirements for the Physics Minor
Students minoring in physics take 18 hours of physics, with at least 9 hours on the 300 and 400 levels.

Requirements for Teacher Certification in Physics
Students planning to become certified to teach physics in the Georgia public secondary schools must major in physics and minor in secondary education. In order to become certified to teach physics in Georgia, students must pass the Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE). Students must be assigned an advisor in education as well as in physics.

 

Geology


Geology is the study of the materials, processes and history of the earth including rocks and minerals, resources, landforms and the biotic and abiotic history of the planet. Geology is a science conducted in the classroom, the laboratory and the field.

The geology program has three major functions:
 

  1. To prepare environmental sciences majors with a concentration in geoscience for entrance into graduate schools in environmental science, geology or law;
  2. To provide courses in geology for general education requirements and middle school teacher certification, and
  3. To benefit anyone seeking a minor in college.

Requirements for the Geology Minor
A minor in geology requires at least 18 hours, as follows:
Required
 

GEO 101 Physical Geology
3-2-4
GEO 102 Historical Geology
3-2-4
Any of the following totaling 10 or more hours
GEO 150 Geology of the Bahamas
2-3-4
GEO 151 Geology of National Parks
2-3-4
GEO 320 Environmental Geology
3-3-4
GEO 350 Advanced Topics in Geology
1 to 4 hours
GEO 360 Geomorphology
3-3-4
GEO 420 Hydrology
3-2-4
GEO 498 Directed Study
1 to 4 hours
From the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory
GEO 482 Coastal Marine Geology
2-2-3
BIO 315 Marine Science I: Oceanography
3-0-3
BIO 315L Marine Science I: Oceanography Lab
0-4-2


General-Education Courses
The recommended general-education courses offered in physics
and geology are

PHY 101 Introduction to the Physical World
3-2-4
AST 106 The Solar System
3-2-4
AST 107 Stars, Galaxies and Cosmology
3-2-4
AST 120 The Copernican Revolution
3-2-4
GEO 101 Physical Geology
3-2-4
GEO 102 Historical Geology
3-2-4
GEO 150 Geology of the Bahamas
2-3-4
GEO 151 Geology of National Parks
2-3-4

but any other courses at the 100 and 200 levels in physics or geology
will suffice.

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